More and more British Columbians are living in duplexes and apartments.

B.C. shift from single-family homes continues: census

Residents are moving to large apartment buildings and duplexes, Stats Can figures show

The proportion of B.C. residents living in detached homes is continuing to shrink, according to Stats Canada numbers released Tuesday.

In 2016, 44.1 per cent of British Columbians lived in single-family homes, down from 47.7 per cent in 2011 and 49 per cent in 2006. The number of people living in multi-family dwellings grew to make up for it; however, most of the growth was found in apartments with more than five storeys and in duplexes. The proportion of B.C. residents living in smaller apartments stayed stagnant, as did single-attached houses, mobile homes, semi-detached houses and row houses.

READ: Lower Mainland residents shift to condos, duplexes, says 2016 census

Outside of the Lower Mainalnd, that trend was still the most noticeable in major metropolitan areas. Souther Vancouver Island stood out in particular with 68 per cent of dwellings in Victoria, 53 per cent of dwellings in Esquimalt, 43 per cent of dwellings in Duncan and 32 per cent of dwellings in Sidney being multi-family.

Rennie Group senior economist Ryan Berlin said the increases in housing stock south Island is exactly what is driving the region’s population up.

“Look at Langford – they are building, building and building and their population growth is through the roof,” he said. Langford saw a 164 per cent increase in apartments in buildings five storeys and over and a 36 per cent increase in apartments under five storeys.

It’s not a trend that continues up the Island, Berlin noted.

“For the smaller communities that are dotted up the Island, particularly those that are tied to the forestry sector or aquaculture, it’s going to be that resource base that drives their growth prospects,” said Berlin. On the Island, it’s those communities like Port Alberni and Comox where single-family dwellings make up over two-thirds of the housing stock.

The same holds true in the interior. Cities like Terrace, Smithers and even larger ones like Ft. St. John will only continue to retain residents if their industries are strong, Berlin said.

“No one moves to Ft. St. John for lifestyle,” he added.

But the same ‘build it and they will come’ trend that applies to the Victoria area also applies to the Okanagan, said Berlin, especially to the more populated areas like Kelowna and Penticton.

 

Just Posted

RCMP officer cleared in Prince George arrest

A suspect’s leg was fractured in 2015 incident

Area timber supply cut by a third

More sustainable, pre pine beetle timber cut levels restored

Students dig in to finish harvesting garden produce

Hands-on healthy living education produces results in October, F2S month

New equipment for Vanderhoof public works

New generation grader and sweeper hitting the streets

BC Ferries restricts passengers from lower vehicle decks

The new regulations will no longer allow passengers to remain in their vehicles on closed car decks.

VIDEO: Sears liquidation sales continue across B.C.

Sales are expected to continue into the New Year

10,000 signatures gained to stop ‘no pets’ rental policy

Pets OK BC said about 1,700 animals were surrendered to the BC SPCA last year due to housing issues

Silver Creek reacts after remains found, man arrested

Neighbours of property where remains were found say man arrested was sweet and polite

VIDEO: Oprah Winfrey and a celebrities attend ‘B.C. Miracle Concert’

Fundraiser featured Foster, Steven Tyler, The Tenors, Matteo Bocelli, Laura Bretan, Carly Rae Jepsen

Human remains found at Silver Creek property

RCMP have been searching the property in the 2200 block of Salmon River Road for the past three days

New B.C. acute care centre opens for young patients, expectant mothers

Facility aims to make B.C. Children’s Hospital visits more comfortable

Search ramps up for B.C. woman after dog, car found near Ashcroft

Jenny Lynn Larocque’s vehicle and dog were found in Venables Valley, but there is no sign of her

Police officer hit by car, stabbed in Edmonton attack back on job

Const. Mike Chernyk, 48, returned to work Thursday

UBC medical students learn to care for Indigenous people

Students in health-related studies to take course, workshop to help better serve Aboriginal people

Most Read