Vanderhoof volunteers address environmental issues

Starting in February, the Vanderhoof Katimavik group will be visiting W.L. McLeod and Evelyn Dickson Elementary schools to present to classes on the subject of the environment.

Starting in February, the Vanderhoof Katimavik group will be visiting W.L. McLeod and Evelyn Dickson Elementary schools to present to classes on the subject of the environment.

As part of their time in Vanderhoof they set out to leave a positive impact on the Vanderhoof community, in hopes of improving the young people of Vanderhoof’s understanding of the importance of reducing, reusing and recycling of waste in both school and at home. By integrating the available recycling services as well as their own strategies, they are focusing on raising the awareness and understanding of environmental issues and offering practical solutions. The current Katimavik group has designed presentations for current students and created curriculum that can be left in the schools for classes to come.

Katimavik volunteer Anna Gotgilf (Calgary, AB) explains, “We believe that the future of the environment rests with today’s youth, by informing elementary-aged children about what they can do to make a difference we hope to increase the community’s awareness of environment issues. By illustrating how even the smallest steps towards a more sustainable future can make a big difference we show kids that they have the ability to be more environmentally friendly.”

Yearly community projects are an opportunity for Katimavik groups to put their civic engagement skills to practical use and to make a lasting impact on the communities in which they live and volunteer.

About Katimavik: Katimavik promotes civic engagement and fosters sustainable communities through challenging national youth service programs. Since 1977, Katimavik has enabled more than 30,000 Canadians to be involved in more than 2,000 communities throughout Canada. Volunteers between the ages of 17 and 21 live with 10 other youth from across the country in one or two communities. They commit to volunteering in the context of a six-month program where they will provide work 28 to 35 hours a week for a variety of not-for-profit organizations. Youth also benefit from Katimavik’s structured learning program that focuses on the development of lifelong personal, professional and social competencies in the areas of civic engagement, healthy lifestyle, cultural discovery, official languages, communication, environmental stewardship and project coordination.

For further information on Katimavik please visit www.katimavik.org or visit our blog at www.gokatimavik.com