Fur Industry – Into the 21st Century

Why is trapping important in this day and age when over 80% of our Canadian population follow an urban lifestyle?

George Labrash

Why is trapping important in this day and age when over 80% of our Canadian population follow an urban lifestyle? A response to this question is many-sided and deserves some critical evaluation.

Throughout human history people have trapped animals for fur, food and other valued products. Trapping continues to be an important economic and also cultural activity especially in remote areas. The four hundred year old trapping tradition has left an indelible mark on the Canadian landscape and the founding cultures that fashioned this nation. Even today the estimated annual domestic retail fur sales amount to 300 million dollars with most of this revenue being generated in the boreal forest and arctic regions of Canada.

In more recent years trapping has become an important tool for purposes of conservation, environmental protection and maintaining biodiversity. With continued human encroachment on wildlife habitat it is essential that insightful management strategies be adopted and effectively implemented. The trapping community has long been relied upon as the eyes and ears on the landscape. If there is a rabies or tularaemia outbreak it is the trapper who rings the initial alarm bell. If there is a need for statistical information on wildlife populations this is also usually available through the efforts of the trapper. Through ongoing input from the trapping community government regulations on season openings, harvesting rates and procedures are constantly reviewed and refined.

It is in the best interest of the trapper to maintain wildlife populations at the optimum level where all components are in dynamic equilibrium. This delicate balance is achievable through a long apprenticeship attuned to the pulse on the landscape. This state of sustainable wildlife use helps protect natural habitat and reduce the potential for suffering caused by disease, starvation and habitat loss.

Human-wildlife interface conflicts are becoming more frequent and of real concern. Habituated wildlife within the urban setting present new and sometimes serious health and safety issues. Wildlife interference on farmlands, roadways, mine tailing ponds and other properties often require the expertise of professional trappers.

Research has found that people who participate in trapping do so for many reasons, the most commonly listed ones are: life style orientation, nature appreciation, wildlife management, community affiliation, self-sufficiency and source of income and food. Most people participate for several of these reasons. A common link in the values of these people is they utilize wild animals and plants to bring sustenance into their households. For many, this is an integral part of their life, and is an enduring element of their relationship to nature and link to the land.

Feel free to join us at NVSS on April 13 and 14am for the 67th BCTA convention. Seniors and public school students have free admission. A mini trade fair will be available in the small auditorium. Information on available tables can be reached at tmakzewski@shaw.ca.

 

Just Posted

Photos: Archery tournament attracts people of all ages

The Nechako Valley Archers organized an indoor 3D archery tournament

Vanderhoof Aquatic Pool opening in a week

District believes the pool will increase recreation and rehabilitation opportunities

Farm and ranch wildfire preparedness workshop coming to Vanderhoof

Free workshop on Jan. 29 focuses on planning to protect your operation from wildfire

Vanderhoof receives $10,000 from Province

The money is going to be used to develop and lease tee hangars at the airport

New book about Vanderhoof’s past will be on shelves this spring

Nechako Valley Historical Society is finishing up the book that has involved the whole community

VIDEO: Students in MAGA hats mock Native American at Indigenous Peoples March

Diocese in Kentucky says it is investigating the matter, caught on video by onlookers

CONSUMER REPORT: What to buy each month in 2019 to save money

Resolve to buy all of the things you want and need, but pay less money for them

Want to avoid the speculation tax on your vacant home? Rent it out, Horgan says

Premier John Horgan and Sheila Malcolmson say speculation and vacancy tax addresses homelessness

UPDATE: B.C. woman and boy, 6, found safe, RCMP confirm

Roseanne Supernault says both she and her six-year-old nephew are fine and she has contacted police

PHOTOS: Women’s Marches take to the streets across B.C. and beyond

Women and allies marched worldwide protesting violence against women, calling for equality

Anxiety in Alaska as endless aftershocks rattle residents

Seismologists expect the temblors to continue for months, although the frequency has lessened

Women’s March returns across the U.S. amid shutdown and controversy

The original march in 2017, the day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, drew hundreds of thousands of people

Federal Liberals announce former B.C. MLA as new candidate in byelection

Richard Lee will face off against federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh

No winning ticket in $10 million Lotto Max jackpot

No win in Friday night’s draw means the next Lotto Max draw will be approximately $17 million

Most Read