BC Centre for Disease Control naloxone kit. (Darryl Dick/The Canadian Press)

Alberta minister says families claim naloxone encourages drug users to take more risk

When administered properly the life-saving medication can rapidly reverse the effects of an opioid overdose

An Alberta government minister says families affected by opioid abuse have told him that naloxone was encouraging their loved ones to take greater risks because they knew the life-saving drug could save them if they went too far.

Associate Minister of Health and Addictions Jason Luan made the comment Friday when speaking to reporters about concerns he’d heard during a roundtable discussion in Calgary to mark Saturday’s Overdose Awareness Day.

The Opposition NDP is demanding United Conservative Premier Jason Kenney fire Luan, with the party’s shadow critic calling the remark “disgraceful and offensive to those grieving the loss of a loved one.”

Last month, Luan deleted a tweet he’d made that questioned the science supporting supervised drug consumption sites, suggesting it was funded by the “multi-billion-dollar Pharma industry.”

This month, the province appointed a panel to examine the social and economic effects of safe consumption sites for drug users.

Luan tweeted Saturday that naloxone kits saves lives, and the government supports their availability.

“I met with many families adversely affected by addiction to hear their heart-wrenching stories and views. Some families expressed concern that the presence of naloxone was encouraging their loved ones to take greater risks, knowing that the life-saving drug was nearby,” Luan wrote.

“I was asked by media what I heard from families, and recited many examples, including this one. This concern was expressed by families and are their words and experience. This is not my opinion or the position of the government of Alberta.”

In his remarks to reporters on Friday, Luan said there was “a fine line” between wanting to help, and becoming “an enabler.”

A review of safe injection sites was a UCP election promise, but the Opposition has suggested the panel is rigged against the sites because they claim it’s stacked with advocates of an “abstinence-only” approach.

Heather Sweet, NDP Opposition critic for mental health and addictions, said Saturday that Luan’s latest comments about naloxone shows he lacks understanding of the opioid crisis.

“For the Associate Minister of Mental Health and Addictions to imply people are intentionally overdosing is disgraceful and offensive to those grieving the loss of a loved one today,” Sweet said in a news release.

“In just a few short months, it’s become clear Minister Luan lacks the understanding, sensitivity, and competence to do his job. Premier Kenney should fire this minister immediately.”

Alberta Health Services has made kits available at pharmacies and walk-in clinics free for anyone who wants one, without requiring identification or a prescription.

When administered properly the life-saving medication can rapidly reverse the effects of an opioid overdose.

Federal Health Minister Ginette Petipas Taylor announced in July that $22.3 million from the recent federal budget will be used to get naloxone kits and overdose training sessions to underserved communities so more Canadians can save lives.

ALSO READ: Grief, anger as family mourns Langley teen who died of apparent overdose

ALSO READ: B.C. and Yukon Association of Drug War survivors calls for heroin buyer clubs

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

‘GoFundMe’ page created for Vanderhoof women who were in a brutal accident last month

Sasha Mortensen and Jessica Raymond were hit by a pick-up truck July 29, while in an embrace on Keith Road next to Plateau Mill.

Vanderhoof sees a surge of scam callers

Residents have received multiple unknown phone calls from a person claiming to be a representative of the CRA or law enforcement, local mounties said.

Brucejack mine fatality identified

Patrick Critch was from Newfoundland

Pretivm Resources reports fatality at Brucejack mine

The isolated incident occurred last Friday, and the employee passed away on Sunday in hospital

QUIZ: How much do you know about British Columbia?

On this B.C. Day long weekend, put your knowledge of our province to the test

371 British Columbians battling COVID-19, health officials confirm

Thursday (Aug. 6) saw a second straight day of nearly 50 new confirmed cases

Remembering Brent Carver: A legend of Broadway who kept his B.C. roots strong

Over the years, the Cranbrook thespian earned his place as one of Canada’s greatest actors

Statistics Canada says country gained 419,000 jobs in July

National unemployment rate was 10.9 per cent in July, down from the 12.3 per cent recorded in June

Canada plans $3.6 billion in retaliatory tariffs on U.S. in aluminium dispute

The new Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement that replaced NAFTA went into force on July 1

Canada ‘profoundly concerned’ over China death sentence for citizen in drug case

Police later confiscated more than 120 kilograms of the drug from Xu Weihong’s home

Answers to 5 common questions facing families for the COVID-19 school year

COVID-19 protocols are likely to vary even more at the school board level, and even and school-to-school.

Visitors and non-residents entering closed remote B.C. First Nation’s territories

With limited resources, they say they don’t have any authority or power to enforce the closures

UBC loses appeal on Fisheries Act convictions

BC Supreme Court upholds order to pay $1.55-million fine

Most Read