B.C. teacher suspended after leaving box of carving knives in classroom

He was also punished for letting his students run in a park unsupervised

A Peace River teacher was suspended without pay after he left a box of carving knives unattended in his classroom, and in a separate incident allowed students to run around a park alone during a P.E. class.

According the B.C. Teacher Regulation Branch, Richard Andy George Roderick Payne left an unsecured box of 20 carving knives in his classroom on May 3, 2017.

His students had unlimited access to the knives for about two hours until the principal and another teacher found them and took them out of the room.

When Payne couldn’t find the knives, he didn’t report it to the school.

A few days later, on May 9, he allowed his physical education class to go on a run in a public park with no supervision.

The kids ran for anywhere from seven minutes to half an hour while Payne waited on a bench back at the school for his students to return.

When questioned about it by officials with the Peace River South School District, Payne said he hadn’t supervised a run for years.

As a result of both infractions, the district has issued him a letter of discipline, suspended him for four days without pay, and ordered him to take a course on creating a positive learning environment.

Payne appears to still have his teacher’s certificate, even though he has been disciplined many times before.

In March 2011, he was reprimanded after admitting he pulled a student from his chair and hit him in the arm.

In October of the same year, he was again reprimanded following allegations that he’d broken a metre stick over a student’s back.

In 2012, Payne was issued a letter of discipline after allegations of inappropriate physical contact with students.

In 2014, Payne was suspended for one day after allegations of physical contact with a student.

A BC Teacher Regulation Branch magazine said that the 2014 offence involved grabbing female Grade 8 student’s face and blowing on her nose, making her “very uncomfortable.”

Some of the previous offences included “joking around, poking or mock tasering students and hugging a student.”


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

B.C. chiefs show solidarity with Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs

Chiefs from around B.C. outside the Coastal GasLink pipeline route in Smithers show support.

Woman killed in head-on crash near Vanderhoof

RCMP say driver crossed the centre line and hit a loaded fuel tanker truck

RCMP to review actions at Wet’suwet’en pipeline protest camps

Senior Mountie says he hopes protests will be peaceful following deal with hereditary chiefs

‘Tripod’ delays access to Unist’ot’en camp

Social media rumours of cultural significance quashed, meaning police “exclusion zones” should end.

Hereditary chiefs negotiate injunction agreement

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs abide by interim injunction, but gate stays up. Still opposed.

B.C. opioid crisis to get same world-renowned treatment approach as HIV/AIDS

A program that focuses on treatment as prevention will roll out Jan. 17

Barack Obama to speak at Vancouver event

Former U.S. president will speak with board of trade in March

Former welfare clients still owed money, B.C. Ombudsperson says

Investigation found 2,600 people docked illegally for earning income

Prince George could get province’s second BC Cannabis Store

The first brick-and-mortar government retail location opened in Kamloops on Oct. 17

B.C. chowdery caught up in ‘rat-in-soup’ scandal to close

Crab Park Chowdery will be shutting down Jan. 20

Teen vaping is an epidemic: US government

E-cigarettes are now the top high-risk substance used by teenagers, outpacing cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana

Vancouver councillors unanimously approve motion declaring climate emergency

Vancouver joins cities like Los Angeles and London

Caribou herd disappears from Kootenays after last cow relocated

One cow from the South Selkirk herd and two from the Purcells were moved this week

‘I never said there was no collusion,’ Trump lawyer says

President Donald Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani says he has ‘never said there was no collusion’

Most Read