B.C. woman files lawsuit over terrorist label

She claims Ottawa gave false information to the FBI to secure military contracts

A B.C. Supreme Court lawsuit accuses the federal government of maliciously supplying false information about terrorist-related activity to the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation in order to secure lucrative military contracts for Canada’s defence industry.

Delta woman Perienne de Jaray’s lawsuit claims her life, reputation, fortune and future were critically damaged by the actions of Canadian government officials in an investigation that resulted in criminal charges, which were later dismissed.

Her statement of claim filed in August says federal officials acted deliberately and maliciously in order to make an example of de Jaray because of pressure coming from the U.S. State Department to crack down on terrorist activity and create more prosecutions related to illegal exports.

READ MORE: U.S. court tosses appeal of accused B.C. terrorist

A court in the United States granted the woman’s application to dismiss a similar legal action in the United States before she filed the lawsuit in Canada.

A statement issued by de Jaray through her lawyer says she and her family suffered years of fear and anxiety over accusations that were baseless.

The Canadian government has not filed a response to the civil claim.

The lawsuit names the Attorney General of Canada as the defendant. The Justice Department referred requests for comment to the Canada Border Services Agency, which said it is reviewing the lawsuit and it would be inappropriate to comment at this time.

None of the allegations contained in the statement of claim have been proven in court.

De Jaray is a former co-owner and executive of Apex USA, once a multimillion-dollar subsidiary of electronics maker Apex Canada, which her father founded.

She has alleged she suffered years of baseless investigation on both sides of the border after the Canadian government told the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 2009 that it had intercepted a shipment of illegal, weapons-grade electronics from Apex — a claim later revealed to be false.

All criminal charges against de Jaray and her father were stayed in 2011. The charges were eventually dismissed.

De Jaray’s written statement says there has been no repercussions for the federal government over her treatment, the loss of her home in the United States, or the loss of confidence to pursue her career.

“I have been left for dead,” she says.

“I suffer from debilitating flashbacks and severe emotional trauma that I have and will continue to spend years in an arduous attempt to manage.”

The statement of claim argues the federal government is liable for damages for violating her charter rights, malicious prosecution and infliction of nervous shock.

The Canadian Press

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Single vehicle rollover on Highway 16 claims life of young woman, seriously injures another

The single vehicle incident occurred at Highway 16 and Hillcrest Way

Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of Sept. 27 to Oct. 3

World Farm Animals Day, Drink Beer Day and Virus Appreciation Day are all coming up this week

COVID-19 cases grow to 13 at B.C. First Nation near Fort St. James

“This is very serious,” says Nak’azdli Whut’en Chief

Directional traffic change coming to one-way street beside McLeod Elementary

This change will be in effect starting Monday, Oct. 5.

Vanderhoof’s Brian Frenkel takes on top job in tough times

We can get through this, new local government leader says

105 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death as health officials urge B.C. to remember safety protocols

There are currently 1268 active cases, with 3,337 people under public health monitoring

Permanent fish-passage solutions consdiered at Big Bar landslide

151,000 salmon detected this year north of site

B.C. VOTES 2020: Few solutions offered for ‘out of control’ camping

B.C. Liberals, NDP spend millions as problem keeps growing

National child-care plan could help Canada rebound from COVID-induced economic crisis: prof

A $2 billion investment this year could help parents during second wave of pandemic

Action demanded over death of First Nations youth in Abbotsford group home

Family and Indigenous organizations push for thorough investigation

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

B.C. nurses report rise in depression, anxiety, exhaustion due to pandemic

A new UBC study looks into how the COVID-19 response has impacted frontline nurses

Horgan frustrated as Transport Canada mandate for BC Ferry riders returns

Transport Canada reinstates rule that bans passengers from lower decks

Reincarnation, baby! Music-making B.C. couple celebrate ‘miracle’ pregnancy

‘I (said) to Adam, ‘I really think this is your brother reincarnated,’ Elise Estrada says

Most Read