Disputes cast shadow on school year

A work-to-rule campaign by public school teachers, set to begin on the first day of school, is only one dispute expected in education in the coming year.

BCTF president Susan Lambert and Education Minister George Abbott have a rocky year ahead.

VICTORIA – A work-to-rule campaign by public school teachers, set to begin on the first day of school, is only one dispute expected in education in the coming year.

The B.C. Teachers Federation confirmed Wednesday it will file strike notice to take effect Tuesday morning. The BCTF says phase one will be to refuse administrative duties such as meeting with principals, supervising playgrounds and writing report cards.

The union and the employers’ association are far apart on a range of issues, including salary and a list of benefit improvements sought by the BCTF.

One major point in dispute is the meaning of a B.C. Supreme Court decision handed down this spring on the government’s 2002 removal of class size and composition from teacher bargaining. BCTF president Susan Lambert says the decision means the government must add $336 million to the public school budget to guarantee a level of service.

“Teachers are determined in this round of bargaining to regain those lost services, jobs and resources to meet students’ needs,” Lambert said.

Education Minister George Abbott has repeatedly said any settlement must fit with the government’s “net zero” mandate that other public service unions have already accepted. Abbott said in an interview Wednesday that the BCTF is demanding “restoration of the world as it existed in 2001, and once that’s done, then they’ll start talking.”

Abbott said the court does not prescribe an outcome, but gives the two sides a year to work out a compromise.

On another long-running dispute, Abbott said he hopes to have amendments ready for the fall legislature session to revamp the B.C. College of Teachers. He said the current system still allows teachers who have complaints against them to surrender their teaching certificate, avoid a disciplinary record, and then get reinstated to teach in a different district later on.

A review of the college last year by Victoria lawyer Don Avison found that even teachers with criminal convictions, including one case of sexual assault of students and another of cocaine trafficking, were able to resume teaching.

A bright spot for the new school year is the completion of B.C.’s full-day kindergarten project, which is now available province-wide. There are 37,000 kindergarten students expected to enrol in the program, after a $150 million investment in classrooms and an operating budget expanded to $345 million.

Abbott said some parents were apprehensive about putting five-year-olds into a full-day school program, but the pilot program last year was well received.

“It was remarkable how the kids embraced play-based learning that is a part of the kindergarten program,” he said.

Just Posted

Collection of obsolete pesticides, livestock medication Oct. 15 in Vanderhoof

Clean Farms program offers safe way to dispose of obsolete items

Vanderhoof commemorates Orange Shirt Day with beading workshop

Participants can learn a traditional Métis craft at CNC Sept. 26

College of New Caledonia offers new automotive glass technician program

The program is offered mainly online, allowing more students to take part from across the north

Local business wins snow removal award

K. Leigh Precision Earthworks picked up Rookie of the Year from Western Canadian company

Todd Doherty was recognized today for his life-saving actions during a flight home

Todd Doherty, Member of Parliament for Cariboo-Prince George, was recognized today for… Continue reading

VIDEO: Rare close encounter with whale pod spotted off B.C. waters

Pod of southern resident orca whales breach within arms length of whale watchers

Rattie scores 3 as Oilers blank Canucks 6-0

Vancouver slips to 1-5 in exhibition play

Veterans Affairs ordered to take second look before supporting vets’ relatives

Liberal government ordered officials to adopt a more critical eye

Dead B.C. motorcyclist was member of group that raced down mountain road

Some group members record their rides on Strathcona Parkway and post times to page

Indigenous athletes in spotlight at BC Sports Hall of Fame

New gallery to feature Carey Price, Kaila Mussel and Richard Peter

B.C. couple who went missing on flight from Edmonton named by family

Family released a statement Wednesday saying they’re still intent on finding the two-seater plane

VIDEO: A close look at what you were breathing during the B.C. wildfire season

Electron microscope images show soot and tar particles generated by worst B.C. fire season

B.C. woman donates $250,000 to ovarian cancer research for friends

Two of Patty Pitts’s friends passed away from the disease within a year

B.C. could provide clues as to how New Brunswick electoral results shake out

Premier Christy Clark faced a strikingly similar scenario following the province’s 2017 election

Most Read