District council update

A delegation from the Vanderhoof Minor Hockey Association requested funds from Vanderhoof council

Council helps Bantams get pants

A delegation from the Vanderhoof Minor Hockey Association requested funds from Vanderhoof council for hockey pant shells for the tier 4 Bantam Boys hockey team at a cost of $54 per pair for each of the 19 players on the team.

Vanderhoof is hosting the Bantam Boys T4 hockey provincials March 17-23 this year, the delegation reminded council.

“After provincials, (the pant covers) will remain with the Vanderhoof Minor Hockey Association as a legacy from the Bantam team,” the delegation explained.

Council discussed sporting event funding requests in with ideas about establishing a policy.

“Do we have a procedure for this?” councillor Louise Levy asked, noting that she would like it if they had guidelines for funding sports.

“We’ve only had about three groups in four years asking,” councillor Darren Carpenter noted, “does that require a policy?”

Mayor Gerry Thiessen heard that the district was donating ice time for the bantam tournament, and he agreed they should look into having guidelines for funding requests.

Councillor Ken Young explained the distinction between funding a sporting event outside the community or something for the area.

“When we’re hosting an event, money comes into the community,” Young said.

A vote to cover hockey pants registered a tie, so the motion was defeated. Another motion to cover half the cost passed

District may increase fire inspections

District of Vanderhoof maybe ramping up fire inspections of local commercial and industrial business sites.

Tom Clement, district’s corporate services director prepared a report at council’s behest  for looking into the B.C. Fire Services Act.

Section 21 of the fire act states the district Fire inspector can enter any premises “at reasonable hours” to see whether or not the premises are in disrepair such that a fire starting in them might spread to endanger life or other property, or that combustible or explosive material is kept or another fire hazard exists.

Section 26 concerning hotels and public buildings says a municipal council must provide for a regular system of inspection of hotels and public buildings in the municipality and that the council may authorize other people in addition to the local assistant to act on the powers under section 21.

The motion to accept the report was voted for unanimously.

Get that sandwich (board) off the street

The issue of sandwich boards in downtown Vanderhoof was discussed at council over worries that  businesses ignore the by-law that bans blocking sidewalks.

 

 

 

Council members discussed how business owners should be reminded they can’t put up signs unless they’re inside their own boundary.

“The sidewalks are district property and no one is allowed to put anything on district property,” mayor Thiessen said.

 

 

 

Botanical aspirations

Richard Burkholder brought council news from local plant lovers wanting to form a botanical garden society.  Mr. Burkholder said they were seeking council’s approval of the concept before time was spent on forming a society. The group was also asking  council to consider providing land, a source of water and the use of public works labour and equipment for some stages of their project.

 

 

Linseed oil is passe

The District of Vanderhoof is considering not using linseed oil as it is unnecessary The preservative was commonly applied on curbs, sidewalks, bridge decks, barriers and other infrastructure around Vanderhoof.

February 27 a report to council outlined reasons for ending the practice and possibly shaving $15,000 from the budget.

The public works superintendent said modern construction materials have weather-resistant chemicals already in their compounds.

“Most concrete has additives that resist salt and ice,” Paul Carver said, “The $15,000 budgeted for linseed oil can be saved and put back into the budget for other things.”

 

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