(Kristyn Anthony/Black Press)

Don’t agree on your property assessment? Here’s what to do

On average, only 1.3 per cent of BC homeowners appeal each year

Unhappy B.C. homeowners have less than a month to appeal 2019 property assessments.

Homeowners unsatisfied with their assessments can file appeals to have their property’s value assessed by an independent board: the Property Assessment Review Panel (PARP).

RELATED: Property assessments to rise again on Vancouver Island

Last year, 1.3 per cent of property owners appealed their assessment – 25, 760 appeals in total. That’s consistent with a ten-year average of 1.3 per cent, said Tina Ireland, a Vancouver Island assessor with BC Assessment.

Ireland encourages property owners to call in before starting the appeal process.

“We have teams of professional appraisers that can answer calls and hopefully will answer most of the questions that property owners have,” she said. “If the property owner is not satisfied there is, of course, the option to appeal.”

But before appealing, Ireland said homeowners should remember that their assessment is based on 2018 market values.

“The assessment reflects market value of their property at a specific point in time,” she said. “The 2019 assessment reflects market conditions as of July 1, 2018…Property owners should ponder whether they feel that’s a fair representation of their market value.”

B.C. residents have until Jan. 31 to appeal their 2019 property assessments – after which appeals are accepted but may be deemed invalid by PARP.

PARP hearings occur between Feb.1 and March 15 every year.

RELATED: Victoria property assessments rise as level of inventory falls to record low



nina.grossman@blackpress.ca

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