Christine Elliott met with Doug Ford on Sunday evening to congratulate him on his narrow win in the race to lead Ontario’s Progressive Conservative party. (Photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS) Christine Elliott met with Doug Ford on Sunday evening to congratulate him on his narrow win in the race to lead Ontario’s Progressive Conservative party. (Photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Doug Ford is leader of Ontario opposition party

The older brother of former Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, was made leader on Saturday

The new leader of Ontario’s Opposition says he wants to straighten out the province’s finances and is eager to take on Liberal Premier Kathleen Wynne in the June election.

Doug Ford, who was made the leader of the problem-plagued Progressive Conservatives late Saturday, says he’s determined to form a government that will drive efficiencies.

Ford says he spoke with Wynne this morning and stressed that she’s a respected campaigner who he’s not going to underestimate.

But he says Wynne has never debated him before.

Earlier today, Wynne said Ford’s selection as Tory leader won’t change her party’s plans for the June vote, pitching herself as the candidate ready to invest in people.

Wynne noted that she and Ford are very different, saying that voters will have a “stark” choice to make in the weeks ahead.

“Mr. Ford and I disagree on a lot of things,” she said. “I think what we are putting forward as a platform is very, very different than what any of the Conservatives were putting forward, which is cutting and removing supports from people.”

Ford won the Tory leadership by narrowly beating out former Tory legislator Christine Elliott, who initially questioned the results before conceding nearly a full day later.

“We’re moving forward on a united front,” Ford said. “We can’t wait to take on Kathleen Wynne and start putting money back into taxpayer’s pocket.”

Over the course of the leadership campaign, Ford repeatedly vowed to wrest control of the party from elites and give a voice to the grassroots members. He also touted his experience running the Ford family’s label-making business, saying it had prepared him to run an efficient government.

“We’re going to reduce hydro rates, start attracting great-paying jobs and business,” he told reporters on Monday. “We’re going to go down to the border and put that great big neon sign I’ve been talking about — ‘Ontario’s open for business.’”

Ford has promised to scrap a proposed carbon tax that formed a key pillar of the party’s election platform introduced under former leader Patrick Brown, criticized the Liberal government’s sex education curriculum and said he’d allow caucus members to vote with their conscience on policy matters.

Ontario heads to the polls June 7.

The Canadian Press

Just Posted


Not what you expect when visiting the post office

Skateboard park finally finds a home

New site adjacent to Diamond #4

Local air show hits turbulence as Provincial funding falls short

Community donations help save iconic event

Cough, cough…Vanderhoof’s air a problem

Wood stove replacement program largely ignored

U.S. consulate general to visit Northwest

Trip part of the region’s first-ever pop-up consul for American residents

Vancouver Aquarium’s resident octopus released into ocean

Staff let the Giant Pacific octopus go into the waters near Bowen Island so she can reproduce

Ontario father grief stricken over murder of ex-wife and children

‘No words to explain,’ grieving father of slain teens says in statement

Russian Embassy calls Trudeau’s criticism of Putin unproductive

The Russian Embassy is firing back at Trudeau for criticizing President Vladimir Putin

Murder charge upgraded for man accused in Toronto gay village death

Man accused the death of a woman in the Toronto gay village had charge upgraded after new evidence

Former NHL player Theo Fleury visits B.C. First Nations community

Abuse survivor Theo Fleury has been working with communities focusing on healing since 2009 and visited Esketemc First Nation in the Cariboo this week.

A B.C. council takes action in wake of former municipal politician’s sentencing

Dave Murray was sentenced to nine months for a sexual assault that occurred 26 years ago.

Harsher fines, new off-road vehicle rules in effect to combat B.C. wildfires

Anyone who starts a wildfire could be ordered to pay up to $1,000,000

Muddy water found in taps at B.C. hospital prompts investigation

Northern Health to hire consultant to examine three facilities for potential contamination

RCMP officer charged after pedestrian struck at crosswalk

A man suffered a broken leg and head lacerations after being struck by the police vehicle in 2017

Most Read