Near empty waiting areas at the flight gates are pictured at Vancouver International Airport, Tuesday, June 9, 2020. Airlines in Canada and around the world are suffering financially due to the lack of travel and travel bans due to COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Feds to implement temperature checks for travellers entering, leaving Canada

Land borders with the U.S. remain closed to non-essential traffic

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has announced that passengers and staff at airports will be subject to mandatory temperature screenings as part of further COVID-19 measures for travellers.

“Right now, physical distancing is still the best way to protect yourself and others,” Trudeau said on Friday (June 12).

“Of course, there are some places, like on flights, where it’s not always possible to keep two metres apart. That’s exactly why we’ve made it mandatory for travellers and staff to wear masks.”

The temperature screenings will first be implemented for those entering into Canada before being phased in for those leaving the country.

Such checks will also be done on passengers travelling within Canada, Trudeau said.

ALSO READ: Elizabeth May says opening border with U.S. would pose health risk to Canadians

Vancouver International Airport is the one of four airports nationwide accepting international flights, as part of the federal government’s COVID-19 response.

Land borders with the U.S. remain closed to non-essential traffic. Trudeau did not specify if the Canada Border Services Agency will be using temperature screenings across the country’s dozens of land entries.

Since enhanced border restrictions were implemented on March 21, roughly 316,500 Canadian citizens and permanent residents have entered the country through air travel.

Upon entry, travellers must have a thorough plan in place to self-isolate for 14 days. Those who don’t have a plan, or who cannot isolate safely, are quarantined in nearby hotels.

ALSO READ: Opening B.C.’s border to U.S. travel ‘is not in our best interest’: Dr. Henry


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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