Investigation clears RCMP officers accused of wrongdoing

Several RCMP officers accused of drugging, beating and sexually assaulting a Prince George woman have been cleared of all wrongdoing.

  • Aug. 26, 2011 6:00 a.m.

DeLynda Pilon

Prince George Free Press

 

Several RCMP officers accused of drugging, beating and sexually assaulting a Prince George woman have been cleared of all wrongdoing.

A 10-month investigation into allegations made by Jennifer Alexander claiming that RCMP officers arrested her after enticing her to cause a disturbance at a party and assaulted her before taking her to cells have been deemed unfounded.

In fact, said Prince George RCMP Superintendent Eric Stubbs, some of the officers alleged to be involved in the incident weren’t even on shift at the time.

In an article that appeared in the Free Press last September, Alexander said she was provoked by an officer who knew her common-law husband, who was in jail at the time, into striking him. Then she alleged she was pulled out of the house, cuffed, and taken to a basement. She claimed to recognize the three male constables in the basement with her. A female constable was also alleged to be there. She also claimed the officers shot her up with some kind of drug

However, radio, audio and video evidence failed to back up Alexander’s story. Timelines, medical records and civilian as well as RCMP statements lead investigators to the conclusion the allegations were unfounded.

Stubbs said an independent First Nations observer, Vincent Prince, was called in while the internal investigation was conducted. He agreed with the conclusions of the investigation. The Vancouver Police were invited to conduct an independent investigation as well, and the results of that inquiry were the same as the internal investigation.

“The allegations were untrue and not supported by the evidence,” Stubbs said.

The only error the investigation concluded the officers made was to breach RCMP protocol while searching Alexander. Breaching protocol is not on par with any Criminal Code violations, and in this case, said Stubbs, had more to do with the junior officers in question being unaware of some of the many complex policies within the RCMP.

Three officers were disciplined as a result of the protocol breach with written reprimands and specialized training. Stubbs said he believes the officers involved acted in good faith.

“There was no ill will or ulterior motives. They just went about it in a way that is not our policy. This is not an excuse by any stretch. Every member is expected to follow policies, but I believe this was a mistake and it won’t happen again.”

 

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