Oct. 28: Council Notes

Council meeting notes of the week: visitor centre move, new regulation sports field off flood plain, Acting Mayor rotation change

Visitor centre moves onto the highway

The district council is looking to move Vanderhoof’s visitor centre to the museum grounds on Highway 16 by next May, with the support of the Nechako Valley Historical Society and the Vanderhoof Chamber of Commerce.

With minor renovations such as winterizing the property for year-round operation, the historic Board of Trade building on site would be the centre’s potential new home.

 

New sports field away from flood

On request from the Vanderhoof Youth Soccer Association, the district council is discussing a new multi-purpose field out of the flood plain, complying with U18 regulations for soccer as well as other sports such as football and rugby.

Potential sites include district-owned locations by Ball Diamond A on Stewart Street East, Hospital Road, Prairiedale Elementary School, and the Vanderhoof Airport Field.

Ball Diamond A, with an estimated development cost of $20,000, is preferred — as the most cost-effective and centrally-located site.

 

Acting Mayor rotation change

The district’s councillors will now rotate every six months, instead of two, as Deputy Mayor — who assumes the mayor’s role when he is absent.

The change follows last year’s extension of the district council’s term, from three to four years, according to a recommendation from the annual Union of B.C. Municipalities meeting.

 

Community forest

Though still in the application process, the province would be providing the district with a forest license, to be operated by the community, in the northeast of Vanderhoof.

The annual cut limit on-site would be 4,000 to 5,000 cubic metres.

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