Students were allowed to handle a human placenta as part of the annual Project Health initiative for those interested in healthcare.

Project Health 2013

The school district held Project Health where students traveled to the hospital in Vanderhoof to learn from healthcare professionals.

The school district held its ninth annual Project Health where likeminded students travel to St. John Hospital in Vanderhoof to learn from health care professionals.

Twenty-four students who have been carefully vetted for their interest in health care got to spend their time listening to presentations from dietitians, nurses, occupational therapists and doctors.

The dietician showed students the shocking amount of sugar that is in different drinks and described to them how planning meals for seniors and patients can be difficult with so many factors to take into account.

“The students basically get an all access pass to the hospital and its staff,” said Darren Carpenter, district coordinator. “They have a chance to get exposed to basically everything from top to bottom in this facility from administration to nursing to X-ray technicians in the lab even the folks who runt the cafeteria and the pharmacy.”

Head nurse Heather Floris took the students on a tour of her part of the hospital where they were allowed to handle placentae as well as have a look at a little baby. They also had the students go through the motions of what a pharmacist would do, making blister packs for patients using candy just to illustrate how to give someone pills that they have to take.

The advantages to doing it in a smaller centre are that, every year, there’s always something that pops up that the students might be interested in such as a doctor cleaning a patients abrasions, with everyone’s permission of course.

The students also get to travel to Prince George and interact with the health care professionals working there. The BC Ambulance Service set up a presentation to show the students what they do and they got there.

The students also get to tour the gene school at UNBC which is an actual university lab, the professor there has been with Project Health since day one.

It won’t be a whole lot different from high school labs but because it’s at a university setting the students have a chance to see what they’ll be getting into if they choose this particular route of health care science.

“It’s not a tour, its a full-on, hands-on exposure to everything in the health field,” said Carpenter. “It allows students to see what they’re getting into and what specific areas of health care they might want to focus on.”

This program is provincially unique, no where else in BC are students given opportunities like this.

“We’re pretty proud of it,” said Carpenter. “We vet the students very heavily so they come for the right reasons, in all our projects we expect a higher level of maturity. It doesn’t matter if you’re jumping on a skidder or seeing someone who has some lesions, we expect a certain attitude and this is no different.”

 

Just Posted

Audrey Fennema is running for Fraser Lake Village council

The longtime librarian hopes to parlay her connections into future village successes

‘Police are ready’ for legal pot, say Canadian chiefs

But Canadians won’t see major policing changes as pot becomes legal

Craig Lepoidevin looks to win a seat on Fraser Lake council again

Lepoidevin is prepared to devote all his time to improving the lot of the village

Steve Little is running for re-election to district council

His main priorities are youth and sports in the community

Village councillor Sarrah Storey is running for mayor of Fraser Lake

The volunteer and councillor started the food share and Walk and Roll programs in the community

Naked man jumping into Toronto shark tank a ‘premeditated’ stunt: official

The man swam in a tank at Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada

Trump: Saudi king ‘firmly denies’ any role in Khashoggi mystery

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is travelling to the Middle East to learn more about the fate of the Saudi national

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen dies at 65

Allen died in Seattle from complications of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Transport Canada to take new look at rules, research on school bus seatbelts

Canada doesn’t currently require seatbelts on school buses

Sockeye run in Shuswap expected to be close to 2014 numbers

Salute to the Sockeye on Adams River continues until Sunday, Oct. 21 at 4 p.m.

Michelle Mungall’s baby first in B.C. legislature chamber

B.C. energy minister praises support of staff, fellow MLAs

Canucks: Pettersson in concussion protocol, Beagle out with broken forearm

Head coach Travis Green called the hit ‘a dirty play’

5 tips for talking to your kids about cannabis

Health officials recommend sharing a harm reduction-related message.

NHL players say Canada’s legalization of marijuana won’t impact them

NHL players say the legalization of marijuana in Canada won’t change how they go about their business.

Most Read