RCMP, CBSA deny searching Meng Wanzhou’s phones and other devices

Lawyers allege officers detained and questioned Meng for three hours before saying she was arrested

Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou arrives back at her home after a court appearance in Vancouver, on Wednesday March 6, 2019. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Lawyers for the RCMP and Canadian Border Services Agency deny allegations their officers searched Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou’s phones and electronic devices after a border official wrote down her passwords.

In a joint response filed Monday to Meng’s civil lawsuit, the agencies say a border officer asked Meng for her phone numbers and passwords in case he was required to search the devices for customs or immigration purposes, but neither border officials nor RCMP officers examined their contents.

READ MORE: Case of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou returns to Vancouver court this week

The response says the RCMP and the U.S. Department of Justice never requested or suggested that border officials pursue any particular line of questioning before Meng was presented with an American extradition order, read her rights and arrested at Vancouver’s airport on Dec. 1.

Meng’s defence team has filed a lawsuit with the B.C. Supreme Court asking for damages over allegations of “serious violations” of her constitutional rights, accusing officers of detaining and questioning her for three hours before notifying her of her arrest.

The U.S. government wants Meng to face criminal charges over allegations of breaking sanctions against Iran but her extradition process has created increasing tensions between Canada and China.

None of the allegations have been proven in court.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Q & A with Rio Tinto Operations Director

Inflows between July, 2018 and June 2019 has been the second lowest since 1956

Fraser Lake business offers equine therapy to deal with life stressors

The idea is to have diverse businesses that provide more options to residents and tourists says Kim Watt-Senner

Smithers man receives two-year sentence for fatal car crash

Over a year after a fatal crash, a Smithers man has been sentenced to two years plus a day in jail.

First Nations push for massive conservation area in northern B.C.

Includes ancestral areas of three Kaska Dena First Nations, just shy of the B.C.-Yukon border

VIDEO: Trans Mountain expansion project gets green light, again

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the decision in Ottawa on Tuesday afternoon

Federal cabinet ministers visit Edmonton, Calgary, in wake of TMX approval

Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi is set to visit Trans Mountain Corp.’s terminal in Edmonton

B.C. municipality prepares to forbid overnight camping by homeless despite court ruling

While courts have ruled against blanket bans, Langley City is employing a site-by-site approach

B.C. auditor says Indigenous grad rate highest ever but education gaps exist

The percentage of Indigenous students graduating from B.C. public high schools has hit its highest level ever

Statistics Canada reports annual pace of inflation rises in May to 2.4%

Transportation prices gained 3.1 per cent as the cost of air transportation added 8.9 per cent

Rich U.S. donors fund anti-oil activism, meeting hears

Much of the organized opposition to oil and gas development in Canada… Continue reading

MPs hear retired B.C. nurse’s petition to change compensation for fatal medical errors

Teri McGrath wants provinces to implement no-fault system for medical errors

Horgan says he’ll still defend B.C. coast after second Trans Mountain approval

Meanwhile, one B.C. First Nation has announced plans for a legal challenge

Demonstrators on either side of Trans Mountain debate clash in Vancouver

Crowd heard from member of Indigenous-led coalition that hopes to buy 51% of expansion project

Most Read