French street artist Christian Guemy, known as C215, cleans the vandalized mailboxes with swastikas covering the face of the late Holocaust survivor and renowned French politician, Simone Veil, in Paris, Tuesday Feb.12, 2019. According to French authorities, the total of registered anti-Semitic acts rose to 541 in 2018 from 311 in 2017, a rise of 74 percent. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

Swastikas removed from pictures of French Holocaust survivor

French President Emmanuel Macron denounced an “intolerable increase” of anti-Semitic incident

Street portraits of a prominent Holocaust survivor that were graffitied with swastikas have been restored by the artist who painted them on mailboxes in Paris.

The images of Simone Veil, who survived the Auschwitz death camp and went into government and politics in France, were found defaced near a town hall in the southeast of the French capital.

Veil died in 2017. The tagger of the mailboxes bearing her image has not been located.

Artist Christian Guemy, who also goes by the name C215, tweeted a photo of the restored portraits on Tuesday.

“Simone Veil is back … stronger than the barbarity of anonymous people,” Guemy wrote.

During a Cabinet meeting Wednesday, French President Emmanuel Macron denounced an “intolerable increase” of anti-Semitic incidents, according to comments reported by government spokesman Benjamin Griveaux.

“We will be inflexible toward those who commit such acts”, Macron said.

READ MORE: Holocaust survivor remembers Auschwitz on her 92nd birthday

France 541 registered incidents of anti-Semitism last year compared to 311 in 2017, according to the Interior Ministry. Properties associated with other religions also have been targeted.

Prime Minister Edouard Philippe condemned the vandalism of five churches last week and urged people in a country where secularism is written into the constitution.

“In our secular Republic, we respect the places of worship. These acts shock me,” he said.

The Associated Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Oregon couple’s stolen truck located at Deep Creek, boat still missing

Jim and Kathy Jantz are thankful for the help they have received so far in Williams Lake

U.S. couple ‘devastated’ truck and boat stolen in Williams Lake overnight

Family from Oregon appealing for assistance to help find stolen items

Australian gold mining giant acquires Red Chris mine

Newcrest now owns 70 per cent of the mine south of Iskut and operatorship

Teen sexually assaulted at Radley Beach

A sexual assault took place at Radley Beach in Burns Lake on… Continue reading

18-year old Vanderhoof woman arrested following stabbing

The incident occured on Aug 14 in Prince George

Trudeau to meet with U.K. and Japanese prime ministers ahead of G7 summit

French President Emmanuel Macron, this year’s G7 host, has little expectations of a unified front from the leaders

Groups ready campaign to help young voters identify ‘fake news’ in election

The media literacy campaign to focus on identifying misinformation and suspicious sources online

Big rally in northern B.C. draws attention to continuing lumber crisis

Mayor Joan Atkinson says about 400 workers have been directly affected by the closure of the Canfor mill

Orangeville Northmen take Minto Cup at Langley Events Centre

Swept best-of-five series 3-0 over Victoria Shamrocks

Expanded support to help B.C. youth from care attend university still falling short

Inadequate support, limited awareness and eligibility restrictions some of the existing challenges

Ethnic media aim to help maintain boost in voting by new Canadians

Statistics Canada says new Canadians made up about one-fifth of the voting population in 2016

UPDATE: Crown cross-examines B.C. father accused of killing daughters

Andrew Berry is charged in the deaths of six-year-old Chloe and four-year-old Aubrey in 2017

Dog attacked by river otters, Penticton owner says

Marie Fletcher says her dog was pulled underwater by four river otters in the Penticton Channel

BC SPCA overwhelmed with cats, kittens needing homes

Large number of cruelty investigations, plus normal ‘kitten season’ to blame

Most Read