Cameron Kerr, 30, was killed in a fatal hit and run when he was walking home on Nov. 18. (Facebook Photo)

Cameron Kerr, 30, was killed in a fatal hit and run when he was walking home on Nov. 18. (Facebook Photo)

Terrace comes together to remember Cameron Kerr

Several memorials and a funds page have been announced

For many in Terrace, the past few days have been at a standstill.

With the tragic hit and run fatality of Cameron Kerr and the highly-publicized search for the driver responsible, people are eager to show they care anyway they can.

Garrett Kerr, Cameron’s brother, says their family is taken aback with the amount of support flowing in from the community.

“We totally appreciate the support, from everyone who has donated to just the one-on-one [support].”

Over $20,000 has been raised so far on a Gofundme.com page, set up by 101 Industries Ltd. to help cover memorial costs. Cameron’s father, Calvin Kerr, is an employee there.

“We’re in awe right now, we weren’t expecting those responses,” says Jacylyn Gordychuk, safety manager at 101 Industries Ltd., “However, it shows how big Cameron was in the Northwest community.” She adds that many contributions are coming outside of Terrace.

READ MORE: One person in custody for Terrace hit-and-run fatality

Although they are thankful for the donations, Garrett says, “Our family, we’re not hard off…whatever money comes through is going to go towards a charitable initiative in his name.”

Given the different passions that Cameron had, Garrett says it’s currently a tough time to make a decision on where those funds will go.

“Some of the ideas we’ve kicked around have been scholarship efforts supporting trade schooling, just because Cameron was a passionate sheet metal worker and he felt strongly about the trades.”

The family has also considered supporting My Mountain Co-Op or any initiatives related to paddling that might help get people out onto the water.

On Facebook, Garrett publicly posted that they’ve received enough flowers to fill the house and respectfully asks people instead donate to any charity they think Cameron would support.

There will be a public service held this Sunday at the Thornhill Community Centre, but Garrett says that they’re already expecting to have a hard time fitting everyone into the venue.

He has politely requested that people who don’t know the family well to recognize that there won’t be enough room for everyone. “I don’t want to exclude anybody, but we have a lot of friends and family coming from out of town and we certainly want them to get in.”

READ MORE: Family of Cameron Kerr plead for driver to come forward

The public is encouraged to attend the next River Kings game, where the team is organizing a short memorial before their match against Kitimat on Nov. 24 at 7 p.m at the Sportsplex. A moment of silence will be held for Cameron, followed with a performance by The Terrace Pipes and Drums Society in commemoration of the Kerr’s family Scottish heritage.

Team players will be wearing a number ‘15’ sticker on their helmets, which was one of Cameron’s numbers when he played for the River Kings. His team jersey with his player number will also be hung up alongside their banners on the west side of the building. Attendees are encouraged to come earlier to avoid interruption of the service.

The Terrace Adult League will also be holding a moment of silence for Cameron tonight (Nov. 22) at 8:15 p.m. He played on their REC league team, Home Hardware.

In relation to the ongoing police investigation into Cameron’s death, Garrett says the officers have been tremendous and that their family is appreciative of everything they’ve done. He anticipates the case to be a lengthy process.

“Yesterday was a long day. It’s mixed emotions for us because there really isn’t a finish line. We’re expecting this to likely take years, it’s a tough spot to be in,” says Garrett.

Sgt. Shawn McLaughlin, from RCMP’s West Pacific Region Traffic Services, says they received “dozens and dozens” of calls from the public with tips, which were all followed up and helped with locating the suspects.

“We’re just very thankful for the public’s participation and the support of their own,” he says. “We are one community.”


 


natalia@terracestandard.com

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