Men and women took to the streets to recognize the fourteen women murdered at École Polytechnique in 1989 and to take action against violence to women everywhere.

Men and women took to the streets to recognize the fourteen women murdered at École Polytechnique in 1989 and to take action against violence to women everywhere.

The march to end violence

Tears were shed but spirits were high during the walk in honour of the National Day of Rememberance and Action on Violence Against Women.



Vanderhoof held a walk in honour of the National Day of Rememberance and Action on Violence Against Women on December 6.

The group of men and women met at W.L. McLeod elementary school and began their march at noon.

Many were in attendance at the walk including Sylvia Byron from the Omineca Safe Home Society.

“Today is the national day of rememberance recognizing and remembering the 14 women that were murdered in 1989 in Ecole Polytechnique,” said Byron. “We want to focus on the action piece, what step individuals can take to stop violence against women and girls.”

“There’s lots of different things that they can do,” she said. “And there’s lots of different steps they can take. Whether it’s joining at the Omineca Safe Home to volunteer, whether it’s working with Nechako Valley Community Services with youth, whether it’s prevention programs in school. The biggest thing is speaking with family and talking about what violence is and how violence affects people.”

The walk was led by Aboriginal singer and drummer who led the group of men and women down Vanderhoof’s streets. Banners unfolded carrying the names of missing women and promoting the day of action on violence against women.

They marched down the street in minus 17 degree weather and they marched past rows of ice candles bearing the names of missing and murdered women.

Tears were shed as speeches were given and there was a lot of support and openness on the very personal stories of violence and abuse that were told.

“There’s lots of things you can do and that’s one of them,” said Byron on the Vancouver initiative Be More than a Bystander. “Be a leader in your group and your community and it helps everybody, this is not just a benefit to women and girls but a benefit to all of us.”