The Vanderhoof Community Foundation is grateful for the planned bequeathal from long-time community member Bill Palmer, and encourages others to keep the foundation in mind when planning wills and estates. (Photo: Supplied)

The Vanderhoof Community Foundation is grateful for the planned bequeathal from long-time community member Bill Palmer, and encourages others to keep the foundation in mind when planning wills and estates. (Photo: Supplied)

Vanderhoof Community Foundation to benefit from planned bequeathal

Long time community member Bill Palmer plans a lasting legacy

The Vanderhoof Community Foundation (VCF) will benefit from a legacy donation made by longtime Vanderhoof resident William (Bill) Palmer as part of his bequeathed estate and is encouraging residents to keep the organization in mind when establishing a last will and testament.

Palmer’s donation to the foundation is the first one she is aware of, to be made as a contribution from part of an estate, Kathie La Forge, president of the VCF, told The Omineca Express, on Oct. 13.

“I just wanted to raise the awareness for people it’s an option,” she said, adding that bequests can be made from funds, insurance policies, property, or the assets of a donator.

Gifts made to the foundation are invested, and the interest garnered is given back to the community for projects or needs. Using only the interest allows the original donation to continue in perpetuity, in memory of the person’s legacy.

“I am a Vanderhoofian,” Palmer said. “Charity is always a wonderful thing for anybody.”

Palmer said he wanted to give back to the community where he has spent most of his life. He moved to Vanderhoof from Prince Rupert in 1946, when he was three years old.

La Forge stated since high school graduation Palmer has led a very interesting life, including completing degrees in the performing arts and botany at the University of British Columbia. He has travelled the world and lived in Australia for a year. He had worked in various occupations from theatre, teaching, and forestry, leading up to retirement when he settled in Prince George. As an avid gardener, he was recently honoured for being a founding member of the David Douglas Botanical Gardens Society at their 30th-anniversary celebration and takes pride in his vintage vase collection.

“When asked why he decided to include the Vanderhoof Community Foundation in his will, Bill indicated that he wanted to support a Vanderhoof-based organization that would keep the proceeds of his donation working in the community, supporting worthwhile causes long after he has passed,” she said. “He said the people of Vanderhoof have always been good to him, and he wanted to pay it forward.”

“I own two lots in downtown Prince George … ” Palmer said. “What they want to use it for is their choice, whether it’s for trails, upgrades in the museum, or sidewalks. It’s their choice. Anything.”

Palmer said he was made aware of the community foundation after seeing a posting on social media. With no spouse or children to leave an inheritance and concerns how his estate may be handled, he researched and decided to gift to the VCF.

“I think it provides another way for people to donate and give back to their community,” La Forge said. “By making the commitment it lets their family know how to have their memory made into an active legacy.”

Anyone considering leaving a lasting donation to the VCF may email legacy@vhfcf.org for more information.


 
K-J Millar | Journalist 
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