Celebrating B.C.’s conservation officers – 110 years

This year marks a very special milestone - the 110th anniversary of the B.C. Conservation Officer Service.

Mary PolakMinister of Environment

 

VICTORIA – Every day, conservation officers around British Columbia are working hard to protect the environment and ensure public safety in challenging and often dangerous situations.

This year marks a very special milestone – the 110th anniversary of the B.C. Conservation Officer Service. The inaugural Conservation Officer Day was proclaimed Nov. 4 in celebration of the anniversary. Eleven conservation officers from around British Columbia received awards in recognition of their bravery, dedication and service.

I am extremely proud of the hard work conservation officers throughout the province do every day, and I know it is not easy. This anniversary is a chance to recognize and honour the dedicated men and women who make up the Conservation Officer Service – who every day go above and beyond their duties.

The Conservation Officer Service has grown leaps and bounds since its humble beginnings in 1905, when they were known as game wardens and were mostly volunteers.  Today, the service is celebrated as a leader in natural resource law enforcement and human-wildlife conflicts and response.

Conservation officers are the unsung heroes of our environment, tirelessly working to protect and preserve our natural resources, and fish and wildlife for future generations.

Yet their stories are seldom heard. I’ve had the opportunity to speak with several conservation officers and hear some of their countless stories of why they love what they do. Many of the conservation officers serving British Columbians got into the role because they are passionate about protecting our pristine wilderness and everything in it.

They speak of their love for the variety of the job, of meeting new people, taking in spectacular scenery and of helping to resolve conflicts with animals. They tell stories of relocating bears, of remote patrols in the backcountry, and of helping teach municipalities the importance of wildlife management.

Several conservation officers were inspired by stories from family or friends, including one who grew up around a campfire with his game warden father. Many others fell into the role through their love of the outdoors.

“I remember meeting my first conservation officer and knowing then, I would one day wear the uniform,” recalled a young woman who has been on the job for nearly five years. “We are the voice for wild things; wild things for which we love.”

The role of a conservation officer is a diverse and demanding one.  There is no typical day. Often, the public isn’t aware of the many different tasks an officer takes on. An officer could relocate a bear, track down a poacher and give a wilderness safety talk to students – all in the same shift.

I am proud of the conservation officers we have in our province, who are outside in the sun, rain, snow and sleet doing their best every day. I hold the B.C. Conservation Officer Service in the highest esteem, and know that British Columbians join me in our appreciation of the integrity and values for which they serve the public.

I urge you to take a moment to thank your local conservation officer the next time you see them out in your community.

 

Just Posted

State of local financial crisis declared in Fort St. James

The District will have a job fair on July 31 to help workers find transitioning jobs

Regional real estate sales down so far in 2019

Real estate sales in the northwest and Bulkley-Nechako regions of British Columbia… Continue reading

Update: Severe thunderstorm watch upgraded to warning for Cariboo North including Quesnel

Potential for strong wind gusts, large hail and heavy rain in the afternoon

Northern B.C.’s Ridley coal terminal sold, Canada divests, First Nations to own portion

Ten per cent of shares transferred to the Lax Kw’alaams Band and the Metlakatla First Nation

Vanderhoof Clippers are working towards getting a booth rebuilt at the Arena

Terry Lazaruk, president of the club said they haven’t been able to host sanctioned meets due to the lack of a proper timing booth

Feds lowered poverty line, reducing the number of seniors in need: documents

Liberals introduced a poverty line that was below the prior low-income cutoff

BCHL: Alberni Valley Bulldogs have been sold

Victoria company has purchased BCHL team, but will keep it in Port Alberni

“Does Kirby care?” B.C. First Nation’s group using geo-targeted ads in Houston, Texas for justice

The Heiltsuk Tribal Council has called out Kirby Corporation for the Nathan E. Stewart oil spill

Trudeau announces $79M investment for 118 more public transit buses across B.C.

Contributions from municipal to federal level to fund more buses in a bid to cut commutes

B.C. woman wins record $2.1 million on casino slot machine

‘That night was so surreal … I wasn’t able to sleep or eat for the first two days,’ she said

After B.C. dad’s death, Technical Safety BC wants changes to trampoline park rules

Jay Greenwood, 46, did ‘a series of acrobatic manoeuvres prior to a fall that caused serious injury and cardiac arrest’

$900M settlement reached in class action on sexual misconduct in Canadian military

After facing criticism, the government moved to begin settlement proceedings in early 2018

Tax take stays ahead of increased B.C. government spending

Tax revenue $2.1 billion higher than budget in 2018-19

Two toddler siblings found drowned on First Nation in Alberta

The siblings were found drowned on their family’s property, according to RCMP

Most Read