Scouts Canada in B.C. has decided to stop meeting in person because of the rise of COVID cases across the province. (Scouts Okanagan Facebook)

Scouts across B.C. to stop meeting in person as cases surge

A rise in COVID cases across B.C. has Scouts Canada going virtual

Effective immediately, Scouts Canada in B.C. will not be meeting in person for the time being, said Caitlyn Piton, Scouts Canada Cascadia council commissioner. With a rise in COVID-19 cases across B.C., Scouts has decided the responsible thing to do is to meet virtually.

“At this time we cannot set an end date but do hope to return to Stage 2 as soon as possible,” said Piton. “After much discussion, we have made the decision to move to Stage 1 – virtual Scouting, effective immediately.

“Although the numbers in our regions are lower, Dr. Bonnie Henry has asked Scouts and Guide groups to go back to virtual meetings for the time being.”

READ MORE: Santa still coming for Christmas, but it will be different holiday

“If we can support the efforts of the province over the next two weeks, we hope to be able to return to a higher stage going forward. This is the time we need to stay in our communities and really tighten our bubbles so that we can flatten the curve,” stated Scouts Canada in an email.

On Thursday, Dr. Henry said there has been an increase in the coronavirus spreading indoors.

Dance, karate, indoor soccer and hockey for kids in the South Okanagan appear to still be carrying on for now.

READ MORE: COVID spreading most among young people



monique.Tamminga@pentictonwesternnews.com

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